new sensations

my art blog:
skybaxrider.tumblr.com

stevencrewniverse:

From Storyboard Artist Joe Johnston:

Some storyboards and animation I did from ‘Giant Woman.’ For a long time this was my favorite episode my partner Jeff and I had worked on. It has since been eclipsed by more recent stuff we’ve done. This show keeps getting better and better, just you wait :)

(Source: joethejohnston, via neo-rama)

(Source: kingtrash, via gingerlandcomics)

tumblgarden:

lucaddi:

pew pew motherfuckers

is this a good enough reason to buy a video game?
that’s an awfully nice first boss.

tumblgarden:

lucaddi:

pew pew motherfuckers

is this a good enough reason to buy a video game?

that’s an awfully nice first boss.

goblinmarket:

thegreenwolf:

Over at BromeLeighad—52 Forms of (Knitted) Fungi!

Amazing!

(via myceliummantis)

typette:

thebonegirl:

man-arenas:

Did ‘I never mentioned that I like to draw trees?

7bte Zwerg visual development, environment production design 

(via myceliummantis)

suckermcs:

Striding Carriage, a man-made-vehicle. The once-proud limestone men of the Hightable desert had been enslaved a thousand years past by the invasive Stardllark exiles. The intruders quickly settled the fertile valley at the desert’s center, the precious emerald whose guardianship was the sole duty of the limestone men. Ever since, the towering giants have been tamed and kept dumb, their bodies hollowed and used for all manner of transportation purposes.

suckermcs:

Striding Carriage, a man-made-vehicle. The once-proud limestone men of the Hightable desert had been enslaved a thousand years past by the invasive Stardllark exiles. The intruders quickly settled the fertile valley at the desert’s center, the precious emerald whose guardianship was the sole duty of the limestone men. Ever since, the towering giants have been tamed and kept dumb, their bodies hollowed and used for all manner of transportation purposes.

tumblgarden:

hmm, stuck in that “do/don’t want to draw” space : /

tumblgarden:

hmm, stuck in that “do/don’t want to draw” space : /

jilliantamaki:

My year of chairing the Society of Illustrator’s annual show is over. Below is the blurb which will be published in the annual book. It’s a rah-rah speech, which I thought was appropriate to share today, when the Student Competition results were announced. The portrait above is by Kris Mukai.
__
I don’t think you’re allowed to declare a “Golden Age” while you’re living in it. But isn’t it fair to say that this is a particularly fruitful moment in illustration? Far from being the final deathblow, The Digital Revolution has reinvigorated our industry with new energy and enthusiasm thanks largely to the generation who grew up online.
Context used to define what illustration was. Then the pirate ship that is the Internet stripped illustration of that context, and to some degree, the client, which made us very unhappy and afraid. More fundamentally, this reversal also untethered our notions of what illustration should look like, where it should live, and what it should do. As a result, the community, which is now thriving online, is deeper and more diverse than it has ever been.
Young illustrators, seemingly unfazed by the fact illustration was declared dead 60 years ago, are getting on with the business of making stuff. Not only individual images, but also showcases for those images: anthologies, collaborations, galleries, self-published books, games, visual essays, products sold directly to fans. (Illustrators have fans now.) How thrilling to see illustration cross-pollinating with journalism, comics, design, art, animation, and other disciplines that barely have names yet. Conventional clients have taken note. Why wouldn’t they? It’s good work.
The best young artists are seeking to define their careers on their own terms. I see this in my students at the School of Visual Arts. For better or worse, they are not content to be someone’s hired hands. They desire to be professionals, yes, but not to create work that only “solves the problem”–it must be meaningful on a deeper level too. It must have soul. When I was a student, I was happy just to render fruit in markers, if that’s what was what my teachers requested.
I’m pleased to see so many new names in this year’s annual. Their work sits comfortably amongst that of seasoned professionals. And while I think there is still more work to be done, the Society of Illustrator’s mission of celebrating illustration and its evolving manifestations seems on track. Congrats to the selected winners of this year’s annual, particularly those new to the Society. Let’s push each other higher and harder and see where we go next.
Thank you again to the jurors of this year’s show, Chris Buzelli and John Hendrix for their help and guidance, Vivienne Flesher and Chelsea Cardinal for their work on the poster, Director Anelle Miller and her staff. Lastly, thank you to Kate Feirtag, my right-hand lady, for her patience, preparedness, and dedication to The Society.

jilliantamaki:

My year of chairing the Society of Illustrator’s annual show is over. Below is the blurb which will be published in the annual book. It’s a rah-rah speech, which I thought was appropriate to share today, when the Student Competition results were announced. The portrait above is by Kris Mukai.

__

I don’t think you’re allowed to declare a “Golden Age” while you’re living in it. But isn’t it fair to say that this is a particularly fruitful moment in illustration? Far from being the final deathblow, The Digital Revolution has reinvigorated our industry with new energy and enthusiasm thanks largely to the generation who grew up online.

Context used to define what illustration was. Then the pirate ship that is the Internet stripped illustration of that context, and to some degree, the client, which made us very unhappy and afraid. More fundamentally, this reversal also untethered our notions of what illustration should look like, where it should live, and what it should do. As a result, the community, which is now thriving online, is deeper and more diverse than it has ever been.

Young illustrators, seemingly unfazed by the fact illustration was declared dead 60 years ago, are getting on with the business of making stuff. Not only individual images, but also showcases for those images: anthologies, collaborations, galleries, self-published books, games, visual essays, products sold directly to fans. (Illustrators have fans now.) How thrilling to see illustration cross-pollinating with journalism, comics, design, art, animation, and other disciplines that barely have names yet. Conventional clients have taken note. Why wouldn’t they? It’s good work.

The best young artists are seeking to define their careers on their own terms. I see this in my students at the School of Visual Arts. For better or worse, they are not content to be someone’s hired hands. They desire to be professionals, yes, but not to create work that only “solves the problem”–it must be meaningful on a deeper level too. It must have soul. When I was a student, I was happy just to render fruit in markers, if that’s what was what my teachers requested.

I’m pleased to see so many new names in this year’s annual. Their work sits comfortably amongst that of seasoned professionals. And while I think there is still more work to be done, the Society of Illustrator’s mission of celebrating illustration and its evolving manifestations seems on track. Congrats to the selected winners of this year’s annual, particularly those new to the Society. Let’s push each other higher and harder and see where we go next.

Thank you again to the jurors of this year’s show, Chris Buzelli and John Hendrix for their help and guidance, Vivienne Flesher and Chelsea Cardinal for their work on the poster, Director Anelle Miller and her staff. Lastly, thank you to Kate Feirtag, my right-hand lady, for her patience, preparedness, and dedication to The Society.

(via magnoliapearl)

suckermcs:

Merid Hord The Brokjaw,  a low-level clansman. The Brokjaw people carved out their treasured grasslands in the center of the fortified jungle of Mosskull by mowing down the 60-foot trees with their thick skulls. The proudest Brokjaw warriors’ heads are so disfigured by years of ramming into trees that they are unable to consume solid food.

suckermcs:

Merid Hord The Brokjaw,  a low-level clansman. The Brokjaw people carved out their treasured grasslands in the center of the fortified jungle of Mosskull by mowing down the 60-foot trees with their thick skulls. The proudest Brokjaw warriors’ heads are so disfigured by years of ramming into trees that they are unable to consume solid food.

ivy-and-twine:

Industrial designer Scott Summit, of Summit ID, creates incredibly beautiful prosthetic pieces. They are created on a 3D printer, with the user’s other limbs as a point of reference, resulting in beautifully symmetric limbs.  

His philosophy of creating personal and elegant rather than mass-produced, functional pieces really shows through the grace of his work.  

Some of the more beautiful things that come out of this philosophy range from recreating a tattoo that was lost to matching a purse to looking like a piece of sport equipment: whatever is important and personal to the wearer’s life become reflected in their new prosthetic limb. 

(Listen to his Ted Talk here)

suckermcs:

Sparrowhawk, miniscule sorcerer of the wild. Many have misjudged the power of this 8-inch tall magician, but few survive after challenging him. In his 205th year, Sparrowhawk has amassed a wealth of arcane knowledge surpassing that of nearly every mortal.

suckermcs:

Sparrowhawk, miniscule sorcerer of the wild. Many have misjudged the power of this 8-inch tall magician, but few survive after challenging him. In his 205th year, Sparrowhawk has amassed a wealth of arcane knowledge surpassing that of nearly every mortal.

comicbooktakeover:

Nausicaa! My half of an art trade with the incredibly talented Paulina Ganucheau! 

comicbooktakeover:

Nausicaa! My half of an art trade with the incredibly talented Paulina Ganucheau

androphilia:

Colus Hirudinosus

Designer fungi from James Stokoe.

androphilia:

Colus Hirudinosus

Designer fungi from James Stokoe.

(via myceliummantis)

suckermcs:

Longcrow Gjib, the schemer and conman. Hated by most, the frequent resident of Grimgeld Prison’s Snipping Ward fell on the wrong side of the feared prisoner, Rombull TomBomb’s rage while in the pits. Gjib’s antics started a riot that eventually led to the all-out chaos now known as the Night of Splinters. It was at this time that Gjib, his secret companion, TomBomb, and the rest of the Defenders of Justice made their storied escape.

suckermcs:

Longcrow Gjib, the schemer and conman. Hated by most, the frequent resident of Grimgeld Prison’s Snipping Ward fell on the wrong side of the feared prisoner, Rombull TomBomb’s rage while in the pits. Gjib’s antics started a riot that eventually led to the all-out chaos now known as the Night of Splinters. It was at this time that Gjib, his secret companion, TomBomb, and the rest of the Defenders of Justice made their storied escape.